HPLC vs. GC: What’s the Difference?

Gas Chromatography is used for the analysis of compounds that easily be vaporized. HPLC has an advantage over GC in separation speed and detection sensitivity in UV-visible or fluorescent detectors. The separation of compounds occurs because they interact differently with the stationary and mobile phases.

Main Difference

GC and HPLC are two of the most popular techniques used in analytical chemistry. Both have their advantages and disadvantages. GC is better at separating molecules with a high boiling point, while HPLC is better at separating molecules with a low boiling point. GC is also better at detecting small amounts of compounds, while HPLC is better at identifying compounds in a mixture.

Advertisements

Read More: Psychologist vs. Psychiatrist

What is HPLC?

High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) is used to analyze mixtures’ composition and properties. It is widely used in biotechnology, pharmaceutical, food, and forensic science.

It uses high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate substances based on their different physical characteristics. This process involves passing the sample from one vial to another, dividing it into many individual components that can then be analyzed.

Advertisements

Applications of HPLC

HPLC is used to separate, analyze, and purify various compounds from a mixture by passing the mixture through an organic liquid chromatography column. The combination to be separated may be any organic compound with a molecular weight greater than one million daltons.

What is Gas Chromatography?

Gas chromatography is the process of separating substances into different compartments based on their molecular weights. It is used to separate and analyze chemicals, volatile organic compounds, and other compounds based on their molecular weight. Gas chromatography can identify unknown compounds by testing them against known standards or comparing the data collected from a reference sample. The process involves passing the sample through a column where it is separated into individual components based on their molecular weight. A detector then measures each component’s amount to determine its purity and composition.

Applications of GC

There are many applications of GC.

  • The GC is used for gas detection, which is used to detect harmful gases and can also be used to detect food spoilage.
  • The GC is used in the oil and gas industry to test crude oil for its composition, mineral content, and density.
  • In the food industry, the GC is used to analyze samples of foods to determine whether they have been contaminated with harmful bacteria or other contaminants. It can also identify substances such as spices or preservatives within foodstuffs.
  • The GC is used in forensic science laboratories to analyze evidence related to criminal cases, such as fingerprints and handwriting samples. The GC can also be used on paper documents such as letters and bills to identify any changes made by other people during their creation or storage period before being sent through the postal system without being inspected by any third-party agencies such as government agencies or banks.

Difference Between HPLC and Gas Chromatography

It’s hard to imagine a world without gas chromatography, so it’s only natural that people would be curious about the difference between HPLC and GC. The two techniques are often used together but operate differently and have other purposes.

Read More: Benign Tumor vs. Malignant Tumor

To understand what makes them different, let’s first compare them:

  • HPLC uses liquid-liquid extraction to separate a compound from other components in a sample. This can be done using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), which uses columns of silica beads coated with tiny amounts of organic compounds. The liquid moves through this column at different rates depending on the compound being analyzed, allowing it to separate compounds based on their specific properties.
  • GC uses gas-phase separation to isolate compounds from each other—much like how an oven separates foods based on their temperature. This can be done by passing a stream of air through a column filled with an inert gas such as helium or nitrogen. The compounds in the sample are chemically bonded to molecules of that inert gas. As they pass through the column, the combinations will separate by their boiling points and come out at different times.
  • HPLC is a method of separation that uses a semiconductor, such as a detector, to collect and concentrate the analytes. The detector is used to absorb the analyte, which then travels through a column filled with an absorbent material to separate the analytes into their respective components. This can be done using either organic or inorganic solvents.
  • On the other hand, GC is a method of separation that uses an adsorbent medium to absorb and concentrate the analytes. Gas chromatography uses gas as an adsorbent, while liquid chromatography uses a liquid as an adsorbent.
  • In the HPLC instrument, the sample is transported via liquid solvent (called mobile phase), but in GC, the sample is vaporized and then moved with a carrier gas (mobile phase).
  • On the other hand, Gas Chromatography analyzes compounds that easily be vaporized.
  • HPLC has an advantage over GC in separation speed and detection sensitivity in UV-visible or fluorescent detectors.
  • The separation of compounds occurs because they interact differently with the stationary and mobile phases.
  • High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) is a widely used analytical method for separating and analyzing dissolved compounds in a solution that can at least partially ionize.
  • In the HPLC instrument, the sample is transported via liquid solvent (called mobile phase), but in GC, the sample is vaporized and then moved with a carrier gas (mobile phase).
  • On the other hand, Gas Chromatography analyzes compounds that easily be vaporized.
  • HPLC has an advantage over GC in separation speed and detection sensitivity in UV-visible or fluorescent detectors.
  • The separation of compounds occurs because they interact differently with the stationary and mobile phases.

Conclusion

Gas Chromatography and HPLC are two types of separation techniques used in chemistry. While GC is used to separate volatile compounds, HPLC is used to separate non-volatile compounds. GC is usually used to analyze organic compounds, while HPLC analyzes organic and inorganic compounds. GC has a broader application than HPLC because it can be used for qualitative and quantitative compound analysis.